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With soldiers present, settlers throw stones at grocery store of Dahud Jabber for one hour, Hebron , 27 January 2007

Da'ud Jabber, grocer

 

I live with my wife and ten children opposite the road linking Kiryat Arba and the Tomb of the Patriarchs. I have a grocery store, which is close to the house and is situated alongside the road. Sometimes, my boys help me in the store. The store is small, and we barely make enough money to cover our basic needs. I sell on average between 50 -100 shekels of goods daily. Business has been bad because of the closure and the prohibition of traveling on the road.

Last Saturday [27 January], following evening prayers, I went home and left my son Shadi, 18, at the store. His cousin, Balal Jabber, 28, was with him. Suddenly, I heard shouts. I thought the shouting came from the store, so I rushed there. Six soldiers and more than forty settler men and women, aged eighteen to twenty-five, were there. I asked them what was going on. One of the settlers said they had lost a jacket and wanted it. I told them, "I don't sell jackets. This is a grocery store." Another settler asked me to close the store and go home. I closed the door, left with Shadi and Balal through the back door, and went home.

We heard stones hit the door of the grocery store. They [the settlers] threw stones for about an hour. They swore and shouted, "We want to slaughter Arabs." A neighbor of mine, Tareq, said that they also threw stones at his house. They did all this with Israeli soldiers next to them. We did not file a complaint with anyone. Who could we complain to? We had already complained and never got any results. Another neighbor, Sufyan, told me that settlers broke into his house the same night and assaulted his family.

In 1993, I began to build my house. I also built structures for ten shops facing the road. The construction cost me a fortune. My family and partners helped me finance it. We invested more than 150,000 dinars (about NIS 900,000). I was hoping for a better life for me and my family, but nine of the shops are closed. My grocery store remained small. If my financial situation were better, I would leave the area and look for a more pleasant place to live. I offered my house and grocery store for sale, but nobody was interested. Now I just have my dreams. Once I thought they would come true, but not now.

Da'ud Rateb Hussein Jabber, 50, married with ten children, is an owner of a grocery store, and a resident of Hebron. His testimony was given to Musa Abu Hashhash at the witness's grocery store on 31 January 2007.