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Daily life under occupation: Officer captured on video knocking 11-year-old to the ground in Zabubah

On 2 November 2016, soldiers entered the village of Zabubah, in the northern West Bank, in pursuit of children who had thrown rocks at the separation barrier. The soldiers entered the cen...
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Daily life under occupation: Officer captured on video knocking 11-year-old to the ground in Zabubah

On 2 November 2016, soldiers entered the village of Zabubah, in the northern West Bank, in pursuit of children who had thrown rocks at the separation barrier. The soldiers entered the center of the village and ran toward a group of children who had gathered there. The children dispersed, but one of them, an 11-year-old, froze. A security camera installed in the area captured the incident on video. In a testimony given to B’Tselem field researcher Abdulkarim Sadi, the child said:

On Wednesday, 2 November 2016, at around 6:00 PM, I went out of our house toward the center of the village where my friends and other kids our age usually play, near the village bakery. I heard from the kids in the neighborhood that soldiers had entered the village through one of the gates in the separation fence, but I didn’t know they’d advanced to the center of the village.

I was playing with friends, and then I suddenly saw a group of soldiers coming from one of the alleys. All the children ran away, but I got scared and I wasn’t able to leave. When I saw the soldiers running toward us, I just put my hands up to signal that I hadn’t done anything. While I was standing with my hands up, one of the soldiers attacked me and pushed me forcefully. I fell on the ground. Luckily, I broke the fall with my hands. There were four soldiers around me. When I got up, one of them pushed me toward the wall and told me to put my hands up. My left arm, the one I broke the fall with, was hurting. I felt it, and I was surprised when a soldier shook my hand because he must have thought I wanted to shake his. All the other kids ran away, and I stayed on the street alone, across from the bakery. The soldiers didn’t manage to catch a single kid and they took off.

The kids then came back, and I told them what had happened. I went home and I told my dad what happened. He tried to calm me down. I was okay, but very scared.